Team

Jieli Lyu

Jieli Lyu completed her M.S. degree at the Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry of Shaanxi Normal University. She studied under the supervision of Prof. Junxia Peng and Prof. Yu Fang, and her main research topics were (1) synthesis and characterization of amphiliphic compounds; (2) formulation and performances of the emulsions; (3) emulsion-templated preparation of porous materials and their catalytic performance.

She started her PhD in october 2018. Her research interest focuses on nanomaterials with a multiscale organization as well as shedding light on the self-assemblies pathways using light scattering techniques. 

 

 

Patrick Davidson

 

After graduating with a chemical engineering degree from Ecole Supérieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles de la ville de Paris, a PhD and an Habilitation à diriger des recherches, Patrick Davidson was appointed CNRS Research Director, in 2003, at Laboratoire de Physique des Solides of Université Paris-Sud in Orsay.

His research work focuses on the structural and physical properties of complex fluids such as molecular and polymer liquid crystals, colloidal suspensions and surfactant solutions. He has also recently been involved in the study of hybrid systems prepared by doping liquid-crystalline matrices with mineral nanoparticles. His favorite techniques are X-ray scattering, polarized-light microscopy, and magneto- and electro-optics. His research activity involves frequent contacts with chemists and theoretical physicists.

He is also presently in charge of the “Soft matter and biophysics” research axis of the LPS.

 

Marianne Impéror-Clerc

Marianne Impéror-Clerc has a permanent position at CNRS as ‘directrice de recherche’. She studied Physics at the ENS de Saint-Cloud (1986-1990) where she passed the ‘aggrégation de Physiques’ (1989) before obtaining her PhD (1992) and HdR ‘Habilitation à diriger des recherches’ (2007) at the Université Paris-Sud in Orsay.

Her research is devoted to structural studies of self-assembled systems and her favorite experimental tool is Small Angle Scattering using X-rays or neutrons (SAXS and SANS). 

For example, for mesoporous materials, the control of the architecture of the porosity allows to optimize transport properties. Main goal is to control the nanostructure during the synthesis of such materials. For this, time-resolved scattering experiments allow to follow in real time the formation of the materials and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. Her research thus lies at the frontier between Soft Matter and Materials Chemistry.

She is alos regularly involved in activities about Crystallography for education and the general public (http://www.cristallo2014.u-psud.fr/)

 

 

 

Team MATRIX

 

We are all working in the team MATRIX at the Laboratoire de Physique des Solides (LPS) in Orsay. The LPS is part of the vibrating Paris region fostering interaction with fellow researchers and visiting scientist.

Cyrille Hamon

Cyrille Hamon obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Rennes 1 (France) under the supervision of Pascale Even-Hernandez and Valérie Marchi in 2013. He was a postdoctoral fellow in Luis Liz-Marzán laboratory (CIC Biomagune, Spain) from 2014 to 2016. He then joined the laboratories of Gaëlle Charron and Pascal Hersen (MSC, Université Paris 7) from 2016 to 2017.

He has been appointed in 2017 with a permanent CNRS position in the Laboratoire de Physique des Solides in Orsay.

His current interest focuses on devising new plasmonic architectures for sensing and catalytic applications.

 

 

 

Doru Constantin

Doru Constantin is co-director of the MATRIX research group.

He studied physics at the University of Bucharest and at the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon and was awarded his PhD at the latter institution in 2002. After a Marie Curie Individual Fellowship at the University of Goettingen he obtained a permanent CNRS position at the LPS in 2005.

His activity revolves around the characterization of soft matter systems, often composed of an anisotropic medium doped with nanoparticles.

These studies are performed using modern, synchrotron-based techniques, such as time-resolved, dynamic, or surface-sensitive X-ray scattering and involve a substantial amount of modelling and analysis, using statistical theory or continuum media models.