Metamat
ABOUT US
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Nanotechnologies

Metamat

We are a team of researchers specialized in nanosciences and we aim at building new materials with enhanced optical and mechanical properties.
Our expertise span from the synthesis of the nanoproducts and their self-assembly to their structural characterization.

Latest News
Two papers accepted on bimetallic NPs synthesis

2020-09-09

 

Determining the morphology and concentration of
core-shell Au/Ag nanoparticles

10.1039/D0NA00629G

Growth kinetics of core-shell Au/Ag nanoparticles

10.1021/acs.jpcc.0c06142

We welcome Wajdi Chaâbani in the team

2020-09-09

Wajdi is a new postdoctoral researcher in the team MATRIX. His interest focuses on self-assembling plasmonic nanoparticles in confinement. The nanostructuration will be resolved at the single supercrystal level using an innovative Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) setup developed on a synchrotron beamline (SWING, @SOLEIL).

Real-Time In Situ Observations Reveal a Double Role for Ascorbic Acid in the Anisotropic Growth of S

25/03/2020

Our article have been published in J. Phys. Chem. Lett. Those results have been obtained during the M2 internship of Kinanti Aliyah. It is a collaborative work with the SOLEIL Synchrotron and MPQ lab (Université de Paris). 

DOI: acs.jpclett.0c00121

Abstract: Rational nanoparticle design is one of the main goals of materials science, but it can only be achieved via a thorough understanding of the growth process and of the respective roles of the molecular species involved. We demonstrate that a combination of complementary techniques can yield novel information with respect to their individual contributions. We monitored the growth of long aspect ratio silver rods from gold pentatwinned seeds by three in situ techniques (small-angle x-ray scattering, optical absorbance spectroscopy and liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy). Exploiting the difference in reaction speed between the bulk synthesis and the nanoparticle formation in the TEM cell, we show that the anisotropic growth is thermodynamically controlled (rather than kinetically) and that ascorbic acid, widely used for its mild reductive properties plays a capping role, by stabilizing the {100} facets of the silver cubic lattice, in synergy with the halide ions. This approach can be easily applied to a wide variety of synthesis strategies.

Plasmonic NPs patchwork

Selection of TEM images of Au or Au@Ag NPs with various morphology. The colors distinct series of nanocrystal: gold bipyramids of different size (purple), Au@Ag nanorods of varying shell thickness (red), Au@Ag bipyramids of varying shell length (green).

Happy new year!

Research
Plasmonic NPs Synthesis by colloidal chemistry

 

Selection of TEM images of Au or Au@Ag NPs with various morphology obtained in the team. The colors distinct series of nanocrystal: gold bipyramids of different size (purple), Au@Ag nanorods of varying shell thickness (red), Au@Ag bipyramids of varying shell length (green).

Shaping nanomaterials

Construction of nanoscale devices is a crucial step toward the sucess of nanotechnologies in a variety of fields. Although construction by addition of individual building blocks might appear impossible without using nanomachines, it can actually be carried out by simply exploiting the different magnitude of attractive and repulsive interaction forces at the nanoscale. For example, gravity is negligible for nanoparticles, but other forces become dominant and require the nanoparticles to be coated with selected molecules. Thus, one can simply let the solvent evaporate and wait the nanoparticles to organize into ordered structures without any intervention. Such strategy is one of the core of the concept of self-assembly.

Gold and silver nanoparticles

Plasmonic nanoparticles (Au and Ag) have been object of fascination since ancient time for the preparation of stained glass. Such elementary building block are extremly robust and their use in monuments stand the test of time. A not too far example from the laboratory is the "Sainte-Chapelle du Palais" at "l'île de la cité" in Paris (see image, wikipédia). This phenomenon, commonly witnessed by everyone, originates from the plasmonic properties of metallic nanoparticles. 

 

Optical properties of nanoparticles

The strong optical properties of nanoparticles (e.g. plasmonic or semiconducting) can be tuned across the visible to the mid infra-red range by modifying their size and shape. When such nanoparticles are organized in ensembles, collective properties are obtained that differ from those of individual particles and the resulting optical properties can be further tuned and even amplified. In particular, plasmon coupling in small gaps (1–10 nm) between plasmonic nanoparticles results in intense electric fields (i.e.,hot-spots) that can be exploited for many purposes, such as sensing, biomaterials, metamaterials design, switching devices, and so forth.

Use of light to study nanoparticles self assembly

We use UV/Vis spectrometry and X-ray scattering tecniques (SAXS) to study nanoparticles super-structures. The structural study of the material is the first step before understanding its overall properties and considering applications. SAXS is an experimental technique used to study the structural properties of materials and gives information on the size and orientation of the nanoparticles, their arrangement, the characteristic interdistances and the possible long-range organization. In a scattering experiment, ordered phases give diffraction signals that are called Bragg peaks. Analysis of such signals requires adapting standard methods of crystallography to the nanoscale, as the relevant length scale is much larger than the atomic scale. UV/Vis spectrometry is used complementary to measure the collective optical properties. Both techniques can be used in situ to study self assembly's pathways. 

 

Mesoporous materials

A mesoporous material is a material containing pores with diameters between 2 and 50 nm. We are devising materials containing a mesoporous architecture to enhance size and shape selectivity for guest molecules or to template nanoparticles synthesis. 

Team
Alumni

Kinanti Aliyah - 2019

Kinanti Hantiyana Aliyah earned her Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from Tohoku University, Japan (2017). She worked in Institute for Materials Research for her bachelor thesis, under supervision of Prof. Hitoshi Miyasaka synthesizing novel building blocks for donor-acceptor metal-organic frameworks.

Currently, she is in her second-year master Erasmus Mundus Joint Master Degree SERP+, working on thesis project about synthesis and characterization of anisotropic bimetallic nanoparticles in real time under supervision of Dr. Cyrille Hamon and Dr. Doru Constantin.

Additionally, believing education should be accessible to all, she co-founded and actively maintains an online-based knowledge-sharing platform for Indonesians (ajarbelajar.com).

Kinanti is now doing her PhD at the Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland)

Wajdi CHAABANI

Wajdi Chaâbani obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Technology of Troyes (France) and the University of Sciences of Sfax (Sfax, Tunisie) under the supervisions of Jérôme Plain and of Abdallah Chehaidar in July 2019. He was a postdoctoral researcher in IEMN Laboratory (Lille, France) from September 2019 to August 2020. He then joined the Laboratoire de Physique des Solides in Orsay (France) as postdoctoral researcher.

Currently, his interest focuses on self-assembling plasmonic nanoparticles in confinement. The nanostructuration will be resolved at the single supercrystal level using an innovative Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) setup developed on a synchrotron beamline.(SWING, @SOLEIL).

 

 

Emmanuel Beaudoin

Emmanuel Beaudoin is an Associate Professor in University Paris-Saclay. He obtained his PhD at the “Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Polymères” in « Université de Pau » in 2001, and his HDR (Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches) in « Université de Marseille » in 2014, the same year he has joined the Laboratoire de Physique des Solides. He is involved in physical and physico-chemical studies of nanostructured and hybrid polymeric materials. He is interested in the relationship between structure and physical properties of these materials, at rest and under strain. The main techniques he uses are Small Angles X-ray scattering (with laboratory equipment and synchrotron - ESRF, SOLEIL), optical microscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry, UV-vis spectroscopy and spectrofluorimetry.

Jieli Lyu

Jieli Lyu completed her M.S. degree at the Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry of Shaanxi Normal University. She studied under the supervision of Prof. Junxia Peng and Prof. Yu Fang, and her main research topics were (1) synthesis and characterization of amphiliphic compounds; (2) formulation and performances of the emulsions; (3) emulsion-templated preparation of porous materials and their catalytic performance.

She started her PhD in october 2018. Her research interest focuses on nanomaterials with a multiscale organization as well as shedding light on the self-assemblies pathways using light scattering techniques. 

 

 

Patrick Davidson

 

After graduating with a chemical engineering degree from Ecole Supérieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles de la ville de Paris, a PhD and an Habilitation à diriger des recherches, Patrick Davidson was appointed CNRS Research Director, in 2003, at Laboratoire de Physique des Solides of Université Paris-Sud in Orsay.

His research work focuses on the structural and physical properties of complex fluids such as molecular and polymer liquid crystals, colloidal suspensions and surfactant solutions. He has also recently been involved in the study of hybrid systems prepared by doping liquid-crystalline matrices with mineral nanoparticles. His favorite techniques are X-ray scattering, polarized-light microscopy, and magneto- and electro-optics. His research activity involves frequent contacts with chemists and theoretical physicists.

He is also presently in charge of the “Soft matter and biophysics” research axis of the LPS.

 

Marianne Impéror-Clerc

Marianne Impéror-Clerc has a permanent position at CNRS as ‘directrice de recherche’. She studied Physics at the ENS de Saint-Cloud (1986-1990) where she passed the ‘aggrégation de Physiques’ (1989) before obtaining her PhD (1992) and HdR ‘Habilitation à diriger des recherches’ (2007) at the Université Paris-Sud in Orsay.

Her research is devoted to structural studies of self-assembled systems and her favorite experimental tool is Small Angle Scattering using X-rays or neutrons (SAXS and SANS). 

For example, for mesoporous materials, the control of the architecture of the porosity allows to optimize transport properties. Main goal is to control the nanostructure during the synthesis of such materials. For this, time-resolved scattering experiments allow to follow in real time the formation of the materials and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. Her research thus lies at the frontier between Soft Matter and Materials Chemistry.

She is alos regularly involved in activities about Crystallography for education and the general public (http://www.cristallo2014.u-psud.fr/)

 

 

 

Team MATRIX

 

We are all working in the team MATRIX at the Laboratoire de Physique des Solides (LPS) in Orsay. The LPS is part of the vibrating Paris region fostering interaction with fellow researchers and visiting scientist.

Cyrille Hamon

Cyrille Hamon obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Rennes 1 (France) under the supervision of Pascale Even-Hernandez and Valérie Marchi in 2013. He was a postdoctoral fellow in Luis Liz-Marzán laboratory (CIC Biomagune, Spain) from 2014 to 2016. He then joined the laboratories of Gaëlle Charron and Pascal Hersen (MSC, Université Paris 7) from 2016 to 2017.

He has been appointed in 2017 with a permanent CNRS position in the Laboratoire de Physique des Solides in Orsay.

His current interest focuses on devising new plasmonic architectures for sensing and catalytic applications.